English - English Dictionary

important: adjective: u026amu02c8pu0254u02d0tu0259nt

Few words

important persona person whose actions and opinions strongly influence the course of events
very important personan important or influential (and often overbearing) person
importantof extreme importance; vital to the resolution of a crisis; "a crucial moment in his career"; "a crucial election"; "a crucial issue for women"
importantof great significance or value; "important people"; "the important questions of the day"
all-important(a)of the greatest importance; "the all-important subject of disarmament"; "crucial information"; "in chess cool nerves are of the essence"
all important(p)of the greatest importance; "the all-important subject of disarmament"; "crucial information"; "in chess cool nerves are of the essence"
unimportantnot important; "a relatively unimportant feature of the system"; "the question seems unimportant"
important-lookingimpressive in appearance
importanthaving or suggesting a consciousness of high position; "recited the decree with an important air"; "took long important strides in the direction of his office"
importanthaving authority or ascendancy or influence; "an important official"; "the captain''s authoritative manner"
self-importanthaving or showing feelings of unwarranted importance out of overbearing pride; "an arrogant official"; "arrogant claims"; "chesty as a peacock"
importantimportant in effect or meaning; "a significant change in tax laws"; "a significant change in the Constitution"; "a significant contribution"; "significant details"; "statistically significant"
unimportantnot important or noteworthy
most importantlyabove and beyond all other consideration; "above all, you must be independent"
most importantlyof greatest importance; "first and foremost, we must feed the refugees"
importantlyin an important way; "for centuries jellies have figured importantly among English desserts, particularly upon festive occasion"
importantlyin an important way or to an important degree; "more importantly, Weber held that the manifold meaning attached to the event by the social scientist could alter his definition of the concrete event itself"